Highway’s Song

  • Long Live the Free Reeds! Peter Stan and a Brief History of the Accordion

    As I sit here in my quaint apartment with a balcony view of Prague’s “Old Town” spires, I can hear a busker below playing Bach’s Fugue in G Minor on the accordion. More likely than not, an accordion busker in America would be performing some ethnic folk dance, and there’s a good chance it came […]

  • The Adventurous Rufus Wainwright Returns to San Diego

    Rufus Wainwright has been called one of the great male vocalists, songwriters, and composers of his generation. Indeed, it is noteworthy how the 45-year-old Canadian-American excels at each artistic endeavor. Wainwright returns to the Belly Up Tavern in Solana Beach on Sunday, June 9, for a performance that promises to be a night of superlatives […]

  • Lila Downs and her Clandestino Musical Mission

    There is a seductive rhythm to Mexican singer-songwriter, Lila Downs’ new single, “Clandestino.” At first, it seems like the familiar bounce adapted generations ago from German immigrants in Mexico. Following the sound of that rhythm allows casual listeners to find an ascent into the realm of some fiery kind of reggae/ska music with a distinct […]

  • DAVID LINDLEY: A Journeyman in the Truest Sense

    Music is mobile. It needs movement and it needs to be released. Not in the record release sense but freed from the chains of commercial interests and categorization. That’s where artists like David Lindley come in to the picture. Deep in the heart of Southern California’s Inland Empire, a few short steps away from the […]

  • Scott Mulvahill: Storytelling on the Upright Bass

    Scott Mulvahill plays a quick triplet that drops down to a low note on his bass. The sound is loose and growly. His right hand makes contact with the ebony fingerboard, producing a sharp slap; he then raps on the body of the bass. He plays a high note, sliding it up and letting it […]

  • The Subdudes: Where the Streets Meet the Choir

    There is a reason why New Orleans is frequently referred to as “the cradle of jazz music.” It’s the place where the ingredients from the original gumbo stew of a historical musical migration took place. An international slavery port in the 1800s, it brought about a unique blend of an indigenous culture with native Americans, […]

  • The Beat of a British Rocker Carries On: Eric Burdon’s Lion in Winter

    The music never ends. When it began, we can’t say. But, listen to the voice of the age and you’ll hear Eric Burdon. Listen. The bass hums and brings on an intense beat that moves in sync with cymbals, a loud surf guitar drones, thunders, and crashes into wall of distortion as cello and violin […]

  • Squirrel Nut Zippers Bring Christmas Joy to the Belly Up

    When the Squirrel Nut Zippers’ Jimbo Mathus was growing up he was nurtured by some of the great traditions of the Deep South. As a music-loving outdoorsman, Mathus’ father, Jimmy, brought his son up in the railroad crossroad town of Corinth, Mississippi, hunting, fishing, and training horses and dogs for hunting. And there was the […]

  • The Kingston Trio Carry On

    “In my youth, they changed pop music, and me with it.” –Richard Corliss, Time magazine on the Kingston Trio So, let’s take a trip to the past for a paragraph or two. It’s the much-anticipated Troubadours of Folk Music festival in a football stadium at UCLA in 1993. It seems like everyone is there: Arlo […]

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